Sensori-what?  

 Photo by Christopher Campbell

Photo by Christopher Campbell

Sensorimotor Psychotherapy is a fancy way of saying that the brain and the body are connected, and that we use information from both in order to help you have a better understanding with what is going on and how to better manage any distress.  In fact, it suggests that our bodies carry just as much information as our brains do, and carry just as much influence in our lives.

You know that feeling where you've worked things out it your head, and you feel like you should be over it, you should be able to do it, what ever that "it" is--but then when it comes down to the nitty gritty, something stops you.  That something is often your body, still taking care of you by following old patterns that used to work so well. And when your body and your brain haven't connected, you feel stuck. This is where sensorimotor work can come into play.

 photo by Allef vinicius

photo by Allef vinicius

 Current research shows that coming at our issues from "the bottom up," from sensing what is happening in our bodies, can allow for better access to what is happening to us now and help us to better regulate ourselves. And when we feel regulated, when our body and our mind are on the same page, we can make better decisions for ourselves and feel more comfortable in our own skin.

 In therapy speak, SP uses elements of mindfulness, attachment theory, and some narrative theory in order to help you learn to tolerate and regulate your distress safely. I have recently completed Level II training, on my way towards certification, and work with both trauma and developmental trauma. Sensorimotor work is useful in dealing with a variety of issues, from depression and anxiety to all forms of trauma--from large traumas that feel unmanageable and unbearable to the small traumas of everyday life. I've seen the enormous benefit of this therapy while working with my clients, and it is an important part of how I work. Sometimes whole sessions can be devoted to Sensorimotor work, sometimes none at all.  The most important part of this work--and of how I work--is making sure that it is the right work at the right time for you.   

 

If you are at all curious about this method of working, please feel free to discuss it with me at any time.  

 

For more information on Sensorimotor Psychotherapy, you can look here:

http://www.goodtherapy.org/learn-about-therapy/types/sensorimotor-psychology